• Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way
    language arts,  memes

    Memes, Jokes and Puns to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

    I’m a big fan of grammar memes, and judging by how popular they are when I share them on Instagram, I’m not alone!

    But let me be honest, just because I love grammar memes does not mean I have the perfect grammar. I’m already worried about all the mistakes I’ll be making just writing an introduction to a grammar post!

    (I’m sure my overuse of exclamation marks is a very big grammar no-no.)

    Memes and funny grammar jokes are a great way to learn about grammar with your kids, it’s a way to make an otherwise boring subject like grammar fun.

    I would be remiss to write this post and not mention the book Eats, Shoots and Leaves Why, Commas Really DO Make a Difference!:

     

    Eats, Shoots and Leaves contains hilarious illustrations showing how a comma can make an incredible difference in a sentence. For example: Slow, children crossing. verses Slow children crossing. With the addition of great illustrations it gives children a great visual to the difference.

     

    On that same note, the author also has a couple more grammar picture books; Twenty-Odd Ducks: Why, every punctuation mark counts! as well as The Girl’s Like Spaghetti: Why, You Can’t Manage without Apostrophes!

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Okay, now it’s time to share some hilarious grammar memes!

     

    COMMAS

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    HOMOPHONES

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

     

    PUNS

    Ironically, the grammar in these puns is pretty terrible.

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

     

    Memes and Jokes to Teach Your Children Grammar in a Fun Way

  • Free Creative Writing Story Prompts - fun prompts for creative writing for elementary and middle grades
    free printables,  language arts,  resources

    Free Creative Writing Story Prompts

    One thing I want to incorporate into our upcoming homeschool year that we have never done before is to add in some creative writing.

    My daughter does some writing on her own here and there, a couple of years ago she was dictating her stories to me while I typed them out on the computer and now she’s switched over to writing her own stories out. Recently she was working on creating a list of characters for a story, it included a family tree and short descriptions of each of the characters, too cute.

    And while I love that she chooses to write her own stories I wanted to be a little more intentional with our story writing this year and kept trying to remind myself to actually write the idea down so I didn’t forget when it came to planning our year out.

     

    Free Creative Writing Story Prompts - fun prompts for creative writing for elementary and middle grades

     

    I’ve had the idea on my mind for awhile now and the other evening the kids and I were sitting around together so I came up with a couple of story starter ideas and the kids picked one and we began writing a story together, each adding about two sentences at a time until we had a decent (and silly) story.

    My daughter was inspired and started writing her own story starter ideas, all ending on nice cliffhangers and I thought why not share our ideas here?

    You can use these prompts in any way you want, give the full list to a kid to pick on to continue, give just one prompt for a child to work on or do what we did – work on one prompt as a group, each adding a few sentences at a time.

    I’ve typed out ten of our story starter ideas for you to go ahead and use, in addition, I put them into a PDF in case you want to print them out and have them ready for when you need them.

     

    Free Creative Writing Story Prompts - fun prompts for creative writing for elementary and middle grades

     

    FREE CREATIVE WRITING STORY PROMPTS

     

    Macy knew the goblin was getting closer, she quickly glanced back and she turned back around only to see that she had entered . . .

     

    Anthony was practicing his foul shots at the playground basketball court. He had been getting most of them in until . . .

     

    Elliott enjoyed taking pictures and one afternoon decided to venture into the nearby woods to try to photograph some moss, but he wasn’t prepared to find . . .

     

    Jane was writing her first book, she was just about to start another sentence when her mom called her and said . . .

     

    One day Jill was practicing piano as was her normal afternoon routine when she heard a knock at the door . . .

     

    It was close to the end of her soccer game when Olivia got the ball and she dribbled it up to the net, it was right there that . . .

     

    Ben woke up excited, today was his twelfth birthday! He quickly went to the kitchen and said good morning to his parents, they let him open his presents right away and he was excited to find . . .

     

    Bobby had spent the last hour cleaning up his room, he was just putting the last Lego in the bin when he heard a sound . . .

     

    Andy was walking down the street when he saw something move in the trees ahead of him, he was sure it looked like a hairy purple tail, he got closer to the trees and found . . .

     

    Ethan, Ellie and Emma were excited because their parents told them today they would be getting a surprise. They had waited all afternoon and were finally getting it . . .

     

    Grab the printable version here.

     

    If you end up using the story starters, let us know, we would love to read some completed stories!

  • When teaching your child to read- should you use phonics or a whole language approach?
    language arts,  reading

    Phonics vs Whole Language When Teaching Reading

    I honestly have no idea how I learned to read. I don’t know who taught me or what kind of process they used but I know that I have been a voracious reader since I was young.

    Since reading is such a big part of my life I want my kids to love reading as well.

    I truly feel blessed to have taught/be teaching both of my kids to read.

    So many people have told me that teaching their kids to read is one thing that scares them away from homeschooling, they just don’t know how to do it. To be honest, I didn’t either!

     

    When teaching your child to read- should you use phonics or a whole language approach?

     

    People often assume since I was educated as a teacher that means I know how to teach kids to read, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Let’s just say, nothing I learned in university has helped me with homeschooling. (Other than realizing that the school system is not where I wanted my kids to be.)

    When it was time for Raeca to start learning to read I picked up the book Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons, I had come across it somewhere on the interwebs and since it was only $15 it seemed like a no-brainer. I’ve always maintained that this book is boring but it works. While this post may contradict that a bit, I guess now I would say the book is dry but it does teach phonics.

    I used the book for both of my kids, with Raeca we did about 80 of the 100 lessons before she was reading on her own and I’ve done about 65 lessons with Ephraim and we are taking a break from TYCTR, we may come back to it but at this point he needed some supplementary reading.

    Before I go any further, let me just mention that Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons is a phonics based approach to reading. And I feel like I’ve now learned that just teaching phonics is enough for some kids but some kids need more.

    But at the beginning I did not really know about different ways of teaching reading apart from phonics so that’s why I went with a phonics based approach.

     

    When teaching your child to read- should you use phonics or a whole language approach?

     

    WHOLE LANGUAGE LEARNING

    It wasn’t until I read Reading Magic that I learned about whole language teaching. Even then, it wasn’t until a few years after reading the book for the first time and a few months after reading it a second that I really felt like I grasped what whole language teaching was.

    I assumed that every child had to be taught to read through teaching phonics. And while I still do think that phonics is important to know, it wasn’t until Ephraim hit a bit of a wall with the phonics based approach that I began to consider something else.

     

    HITTING THE PHONICS WALL

    It took me quite a while to realize that Ephraim had hit a wall with phonics. I assumed he just needed more practice but it was frustrating to hear him sound out every single word, especially when he had just read that exact word four words ago.

    I started to notice that he was still sounding out words like “it” and “is” but was catching on to the bigger, sight words, first with said, then little, etc.

    I thought those short words would click after continuing through TYCTR but it just wasn’t happening, that’s when I knew we needed to do something different.

     

    When teaching your child to read- should you use phonics or a whole language approach?

     

    THROWING PHONICS OUT THE WINDOW, KINDA

    Since Ephraim knew the phonics basics I was good with pretty much throwing it out the window. It’s the whole idea of knowing the rules and then breaking them. He knew how to sound things out and now he just needed to stop sounding everything out.

    To help with that we entered the land of Elephant and Piggie.

    Thank you, Mo Willms, for making our reading so much more fun! These books are silly, have quite a few pages but not very many words on a page and are repetitive enough for practice but not so much so that they become boring. He really is the modern day Dr. Seuss (who we also love).

     

    HOW WE INCREASE FLOW AND FLUENCY AND REDUCE DISCOURAGEMENT

    The part where Elephant and Piggie books are different than Dr. Seuss is there are some big, non-phonics in each books, the Elephant’s name is Gerald after all. #phonicsnightmare

    To help keep the flow and fluency and keep discouragement to a minimum I generally jump in when a new “big” word is introduced or if there are words that are a current struggle.

    I thought it might be helpful to take you along while Ephraim read an Elephant and Piggie book to give an idea of how much sounding out is being done and how much I help. The book he’s reading in this video he had read one other time so he knew what was happening but he didn’t have it all memorized – that’s the sweet spot when learning to read.

    I do wish I would have angled the camera down a bit more for this video so you could see the book as he was reading. Sorry about that. #learning

     

    I would love to hear how you approach reading, do you gravitate more towards phonics or whole language? Have you noticed a difference from one child to the other?

     

    OTHER POSTS YOU MAY ENJOY:

  • Creating a Rich Writing Experience in Our Homeschool with Brave Writer and The Writer's Jungle
    language arts,  methods & philosophies,  real homeschool stories

    Creating a Rich Writing Experience in Our Homeschool

    I’m honestly not sure if one can be involved in the homeschool community in any way online without quickly hearing about Brave Writer. If you read around homeschool blogs for more than five minutes you are going to hear about someone raving about Julie and Brave Writer. And for good reason.

    Remember when I was talking about Poetry Tea Time and how much my kids adore it (if I forget one week they are bound to remember)? Well, Poetry Tea Time is the brain child of Julie over at Brave Writer.

    I recently received The Writer’s Jungle from Brave Writer after hearing so many people rave about it.

    Creating a Rich Writing Experience in Our Homeschool with Brave Writer and The Writer's Jungle

    When people find out that I’m actually a teacher by education they always comment on how it must be so helpful for homeschooling. It’s not. Honestly, there were very limited courses that I took in university that were actually beneficial to me in the classroom (home economics and social studies to be exact), I came out with a degree in education with an English minor and had no idea how to teach kids to write.

    After graduating university and before having kids I was covering a maternity leave and my main classes I taught were grade 7 & 8 English. Oh man, looking back now I feel so sorry for those kids. I had no idea what I was doing. As I was reading through The Writer’s Jungle I just kept thinking, if only I would have had this when I was teaching! It would have been so helpful.

    And while I can’t go back and fix my mistakes as a teacher in the classroom I can make sure I don’t make those same mistakes as a homeschooling mom, and The Writer’s Jungle is definitely going to be a part of making sure that doesn’t happen!

    Creating a Rich Writing Experience in Our Homeschool with Brave Writer and The Writer's Jungle

    so what is the writer’s jungle?

    The Writer’s Jungle is a huge ebook (or binder if you buy that copy) that is designed to teach the homeschool parent how to teach writing. Julie includes a number of different ideas and activities that will help your child fall in love with writing. With The Writer’s Jungle it’s not about learning different techniques just to know them but to enrich a child’s writing.

    While reading what Julie wrote about alliterations I was inspired to teach Raeca about them and now we like to make up silly alliterations about people, like: Robot Riding Raeca, Finger Fighting Phillip, Carrot Kicker Chloe, Bouncing Ball Billy, Jumbo Jumping Jilly, etc. It was a fun way for her to learn alliterations and we randomly shout out new ones as we think of them.

    The Writer’s Jungle is intended for ages 8-18 and they do have a program called Jot it Down for younger children.

    The book is large (over 260 pages!) but don’t let that intimidate you! You don’t need to read the whole thing before you can start implementing what Julie shares.

    Creating a Rich Writing Experience in Our Homeschool with Brave Writer and The Writer's Jungle

    my child is 5 (or 6 or 7), do I need to purchase jot it down or would the writer’s jungle be better?

    Honestly, I haven’t read Jot It Down so I can’t say for sure but my daughter is 6 and I’ve been implementing and adapting a number of the activities in The Writer’s Jungle with her, though I do most of the physical writing (or typing). If you want to purchase both Brave Writer has them together in a bundle along with your choice of The Wand or A Quiver of Arrows where you can save some money by purchasing them all together.

    All in all, I’m really excited to implement so much of what I have learned from The Writer’s Jungle into our homeschool and while I wish I would have read this back when I was teaching in the classroom I’m glad to have come across it so early in our homeschooling journey!

    Creating a Rich Writing Experience in Our Homeschool with Brave Writer and The Writer's Jungle

    Helpful Hint: I got the digital copy, which I love because I’m all about ebooks these days, if you get the digital copy you can send it to your Kindle (or Kindle app) and actually have it convert to the Kindle format. This is really helpful for when you want to highlight half the book like I did.
    To send it to yourself you need to know your Kindle email address, you can find this by going to Amazon – Your Account – Manage My Content and Devices – Settings – Personal Document Settings. Under this heading they have your Kindle email listed.
    Now all you need to do is email this address with the PDF attached, doing this will send the PDF version but if you type convert into the subject line it will convert it into a Kindle book. This has been so helpful for me, I now use this all the time.

    While Ephraim isn’t doing any type of Brave Writer writing at this point he likes to sit beside Raeca and write letters, it’s pretty adorable.

    Creating a Rich Writing Experience in Our Homeschool with Brave Writer and The Writer's Jungle

    Full disclosure: I received a free copy of The Writer’s Jungle in exchange for an honest review, but I actually contacted the lovely people over at Brave Writer about it because I had heard so many good things about The Writer’s Jungle!

  • Games in our Homeschool and some of our favorites
    games,  language arts,  math,  music,  science

    Using Games in our Homeschool

    My husband has always loved games, he even has a group of friends that get together every month to play games. So it comes as no surprise to me that both my kids ask to play games often.

    The only games I played when I was younger were pretty much Clue with my brother and endless rounds of Monopoly with one of my cousins (we did not play by the rules).

    We don’t have a huge selection of games but we are slowly building it over birthdays and Christmases, games are such a great gift to give kids.

    Thankfully almost every game out there has some kind of educational benefit to it so I can feel good with incorporating them into our homeschool day, the kids are still learning skills but they don’t even know it.

    Some of the skills kids learn when playing games include:

    • developing fine motor skills
    • social skills
    • learning how to win or lose graciously
    • cooperation
    • following directions
    • math skills
    • deductive reasoning
    • strategy
    • and lots more!

    I thought I would share a few of our current favorite games.

    [mybooktable book=”outfoxed” display=”summary” buybutton_shadowbox=”false”]

    [mybooktable book=”circuit-maze” display=”summary” buybutton_shadowbox=”false”]

    [mybooktable book=”sushi-go” display=”summary” buybutton_shadowbox=”false”]

    [mybooktable book=”robot-turtles” display=”summary” buybutton_shadowbox=”false”]

    [mybooktable book=”scrabble-junior” display=”summary” buybutton_shadowbox=”false”]

    What are your favorite games to use in your homeschool?

  • Our Free Homeschool Grade 1 Language Arts Curriculum - lots of reading and a bit of writing.
    curriculum,  language arts

    Our (Practically Free) Grade 1 Language Arts Curriculum

    Over the next few weeks I will be sharing how I am planning our practically free grade one curriculum. Today I’m on to our language arts curriculum.

    You can check out the rest of the series here:

    If you are looking for ways to save money in your homeschool without skimping on education make sure to come back and check out the other posts in the next few weeks!

    Our Free Homeschool Grade 1 Language Arts Curriculum - lots of reading and a bit of writing.

    Our only expenses for our language arts curriculum have been books, some paper and pencils, there is currently nothing we bought just because we are homeschooling.

    OUR GRADE ONE
    LANGUAGE ARTS CURRICULUM:

    READING

    Raeca is already reading and just starting into chapter books. My main reading goal is just for her to continue to read and increase her skill. As she continues to read her speed should increase and I’m assuming she will soon learn to read inside her head.

    We will be doing a number of read alouds this year as well, tons of picture books (as always) and a number of chapter books. I’m currently gathering a list of chapter books I’d like for us to read/listen to on audio book for this year, that will be Friday’s book list. (UPDATE: here’s our grade one read aloud book list)

    For those that are curious on how we taught her to read in the first place, we mainly used Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons. You can check out my post, Teach Reading the Simple Way for full details on how we used the book and how we supplemented her reading.

    PICTURE BOOK STUDIES

    We will also be doing a few in-depth picture book studies throughout the year, starting with Chrysanthemum. With the picture book studies we will work most of our subjects in with the book we are studying and focus on that for a few days or a week.

    WRITING

    We are working on printing by using the Handwriting Without Tears Grade 1 book a bit as well as practicing printing through copywork.

    We are taking copywork fairly slow and introducing it through notebook a variety of subjects (mainly science, history and geography), in addition she will be copying a verse out each week. As grade 1 progresses the writing will increase as her speed and stamina increase.

    Raeca also does a lot of writing on her own time, stories or notes to people, they are pretty cute to read and try to decipher.

    grade-1-language-arts

    Translation:
    Dear Ephraim,
    I am really, really sorry.
    Do you forgive me? I forgive you.
    By Raeca
    Thanks!

    And that sums up our grade 1 language arts! It will involve a lot of books but be pretty relaxed at the same time.

    BOOKS MENTIONED IN THIS POST:

    [mybooktable book=”teach-child-read-100-easy-lessons” display=”summary” buybutton_shadowbox=”false”]

    [mybooktable book=”chrysanthemum” display=”summary” buybutton_shadowbox=”false”]